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Rudner MacDonald - Toronto Employment Law Firm
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Category Archives: Hiring

Understanding Restrictive Covenants

As one of my recent Canadian HR Law blog posts details, there is a seemingly never-ending battle between the rights of employers to protect their legitimate business interests and the rights of individuals to pursue their livelihood. It often comes as a shock to organizations that one of their employees could leave, join their fiercest competitor, and immediately begin pursuing […]


Martin Luther King Jr. Day Highlights Human Rights Issues

In honour of Martin Luther King Jr. Day passing in the United States, my latest Canadian HR Law blog post examines how human rights legislation here in Canada has developed to protect against discrimination. Martin Luther King Jr. was a hero because he stood up to the widespread discrimination against persons of colour in the United States. It wasn’t that long ago […]


Update on Police Record Checks

  Adding to the ever-increasing list of laws for employers to be mindful of, in my latest Canadian HR Law blog post I discuss the recently passed the Police Record Checks Reform Act, 2015. This new legislation intended to change the way employers conduct police record checks and will impact their ability to do so. All employers should be aware of the new […]


Agreeing to Terms Before the Agreement

In my latest Canadian HR Law Blog post, I discuss the importance of coming to an agreement on all terms in writing – not just the essentials – in order for a contract be legally binding. Consider Consideration A contract must involve consideration flowing both ways. In other words, both parties must give and receive some sort of benefit. As […]


Let Your Inner Employment Lawyer Out

In my most recent Canadian HR Law Blog Post, I developed a theme: employers should “let their inner employment lawyer out“. In other words, before taking any action that might impact an employment relationship, employers should consider the potential legal implications. The same applies to employees. When I was invited to speak at the Employer Council conference put on last week […]


Calling an employee an “independent contractor” exposes both parties to liability

In my latest blog post for First Reference Talks, I addressed the prevalent issue of “independent contractors” that are employees in all but name, and the risks that both parties expose themselves to when they choose to pay an employee as if they were independent. As I have written about in the past, there seems to be a trend toward […]


On June 12, 2014, Natalie Speaks at the LSUC’s Solo and Small Firm Conference on Interviewing

On June 12, 2014, Natalie will be addressing the issues of interviewing at the Law Society of Upper Canada’s Solo and Small Firm Conference. Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)


Calling a worker an ‘intern’ is not a magic bullet

The issue of unpaid interns continues to be in the news, as Rogers has now cancelled some of its intern programs in light of a Ministry clampdown on such programs. Employers need to understand that applying the term “intern” or “unpaid intern” is not a magic bullet that allows you to avoid all of the requirements of employment standards legislation. […]


Proper, consistent hiring practices crucial

In my latest Canadian HR Law Blog post, I picked up on a discussion that took place on my Canadian HR Law Group on LinkedIn. A member recently posted this inquiry: We have just hired a new employee who is performing well after one month, but his former employer has informed us that they were investigating him for theft before he resigned. […]


June 12, 2014 – Law Society Solo & Small Firm Conference

Natalie will be speaking on interviewing at the Law Society of Upper Canada Solo and Small Firm Conference.   Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)


Presentation – Employment Law 101: From Hiring to Firing

Employment Law 101: From Hiring to Firing from RudnerMacDonaldLLP Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)



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